Planning the Future of Stormwater Management


Posted July 14, 2011

 
By Mike Beezhold, Senior Planner, CDM


I was excited and encouraged last month to see the effort put forward by WEF staff and the participation by stormwater professionals from around the country to contemplate The Future of Stormwater. The June 21-22 facilitated conversation in Alexandria came at a critical juncture of anticipated increased regulations, difficult economic climate, and a couple of decades of stormwater experience among regulated communities. Experts deliberated the biggest issues in stormwater as well as those facing stormwater professionals, and the discussion format was primarily brainstorming rather than trying to reach consensus or prioritize needs. Significant issues included the uncertainty of regulations, cost of monitoring, limited experience with stormwater best management practices or BMPs and green infrastructure, lack of capital and maintenance cost data, limited dedicated funding sources and the need for leadership and liaison with regulatory agencies. We were all encouraged that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) staff joined the discussion and shared the latest in the stormwater rulemaking.


On day two, thinking out of the box was encouraged to discuss ways to move the profession forward to address future regulatory demands, barriers to acceptance and implementation, and funding constraints. One out-of-the-box suggestion was to tie funding requirements to MS4 permits to ensure a base level of funding to meet regulatory requirements as well as capital and O&M demands of this critical but seldom seen infrastructure. Since attending the first Stormwater Council meeting at WEFTEC 2010, I have felt that WEF can provide the credibility to the stormwater field as it has built for the wastewater profession, and the group concurred with the future of WEF’s leadership role in the stormwater community. This alignment would inherently bring with it WEF’s good rapport and respect within the regulatory community, allowing stormwater professionals to collectively engage in proactive ways to steer good policy rather than reactively as one among many regulated entities. Before departing, the experts laid the foundation for both stormwater vision and mission statements for WEF and the newly formed Stormwater Council to be drafted in time for WEFTEC 2011. To learn more visit the Access Water Knowledge stormwater webpage at www.wef.org/stormwater.

 07/13/2011Permanent link

Planning the Future of Stormwater Management  ()
 

Posted July 14, 2011


I was excited and encouraged last month to see the effort put forward by WEF staff and the participation by stormwater professionals from around the country to contemplate The Future of Stormwater. The June 21-22 facilitated conversation in Alexandria came at a critical juncture of anticipated increased regulations, difficult economic climate, and a couple of decades of stormwater experience among regulated communities.

Comments (2)


Nice article, thanks for the information.

Posted by: rental mobil (griyamobilkita@gmail.com) on 08/01/2011

No doubt it's really a great article and I felt really great going through your blog post. Great to read more articles from your side.

Posted by: Pellet Mill Manufacturer (dsgtfcandy@yahoo.com) on 10/18/2011

Planning the Future of Stormwater Management

 Permanent link

Planning the Future of Stormwater Management


Posted July 14, 2011

 
By Mike Beezhold, Senior Planner, CDM


I was excited and encouraged last month to see the effort put forward by WEF staff and the participation by stormwater professionals from around the country to contemplate The Future of Stormwater. The June 21-22 facilitated conversation in Alexandria came at a critical juncture of anticipated increased regulations, difficult economic climate, and a couple of decades of stormwater experience among regulated communities. Experts deliberated the biggest issues in stormwater as well as those facing stormwater professionals, and the discussion format was primarily brainstorming rather than trying to reach consensus or prioritize needs. Significant issues included the uncertainty of regulations, cost of monitoring, limited experience with stormwater best management practices or BMPs and green infrastructure, lack of capital and maintenance cost data, limited dedicated funding sources and the need for leadership and liaison with regulatory agencies. We were all encouraged that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) staff joined the discussion and shared the latest in the stormwater rulemaking.


On day two, thinking out of the box was encouraged to discuss ways to move the profession forward to address future regulatory demands, barriers to acceptance and implementation, and funding constraints. One out-of-the-box suggestion was to tie funding requirements to MS4 permits to ensure a base level of funding to meet regulatory requirements as well as capital and O&M demands of this critical but seldom seen infrastructure. Since attending the first Stormwater Council meeting at WEFTEC 2010, I have felt that WEF can provide the credibility to the stormwater field as it has built for the wastewater profession, and the group concurred with the future of WEF’s leadership role in the stormwater community. This alignment would inherently bring with it WEF’s good rapport and respect within the regulatory community, allowing stormwater professionals to collectively engage in proactive ways to steer good policy rather than reactively as one among many regulated entities. Before departing, the experts laid the foundation for both stormwater vision and mission statements for WEF and the newly formed Stormwater Council to be drafted in time for WEFTEC 2011. To learn more visit the Access Water Knowledge stormwater webpage at www.wef.org/stormwater.

Posted by Stephanie Barringer at 07/13/2011 03:21:31 PM | 


Comments
Nice article, thanks for the information.
Posted by: rental mobil ( Email | Visit ) at 8/1/2011 11:03 PM


No doubt it's really a great article and I felt really great going through your blog post. Great to read more articles from your side.
Posted by: Pellet Mill Manufacturer ( Email | Visit ) at 10/18/2011 5:02 AM


Mike BeezholdPosted by:
Michael Beezhold, Senior Planner and Project Manager, Camp Dresser McKee, Inc. (CDM) 

Mr. Michael Beezhold is a Senior Planner and Project Manager at Camp Dresser McKee, Inc. (CDM). He received his masters of science degree in Forestry at Southern Illinois University specializing in natural resource management, valuation and planning. Mr. Beezhold has nearly 20 years experience in the water resources field supporting municipal, state and federal clients including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as well as all branches of the military on water resource challenges throughout the country. Most recently he served eight years as the Department of Public Works Watershed Manager for the City of Lenexa, Kansas’ award winning stormwater program, Rain to Recreation. Prior to working for the City of Lenexa, he served as an inaugural Urban Watershed Conservationist with the Missouri Department of Conservation promoting the appropriate conservation and application of green infrastructure in the management of stormwater.