Happy New Year!

Posted by Ed McCormick, WEF Vice President
Posted Jan. 4, 2013
 

 

Now is an amazing time to be a water environment professional, since there are a plethora of huge challenges facing us. The part we will play in developing and implementing solutions will be critical to 7 billion people around the globe. It is the year 2013, yet more than 1 billion people worldwide still lack access to clean drinking water, and more than twice that number are without basic sanitation. But the good news is that our profession has all the tools we need to overcome these challenges. We have the knowledge and the resources to apply our expertise and develop creative strategies to solve the enormous global air and water quality issues. We are identifying solutions to address perhaps the greatest challenge our profession has ever faced — building resilient water infrastructure to meet society’s increased needs due to climate change, while simultaneously reducing our carbon footprint to one that can be sustained in the centuries ahead.

 

A great example of how our sector applies its skills and ingenuity is the current sea change in the wastewater sector. We are evolving thinking from treatment of water alone to recovering valuable resources, including clean, renewable energy; nutrients; and recycled water in our “green factories,” the facilities once known as wastewater treatment plants.

 

Everyone in the water sector is talking about the nexus between water and power. The power sector is a major consumer of water while the water sector is a major consumer of power. Because of this link, efforts to reduce water use provide energy savings, and efforts to reduce energy use save water. In addition, both sectors are impacted by, and have an impact on climate change. This year, we celebrate the 100th anniversary of activated sludge, a technology that revolutionized wastewater treatment. Today, we look toward new technologies and approaches that are just as effective as activated sludge, but much less energy-intensive. Some of the best minds in our industry, such as Professor Perry McCarty of Stanford University (Palo Alto, Calif.), are at work researching how to attain the “holy grail” of anaerobic secondary treatment, which would cut energy use significantly while increasing biogas production and associated clean, renewable energy production.

 

WEF is leading the water sector forward into this brave new world, taking bold action to provide the water community with practical tools to reduce our carbon footprint and reliance on fossil fuels while increasing energy production revenues, through a new water and wastewater utility guide to more sustainable energy management. This guide will be published this spring, with copies available at the May 6–9 Energy and Water Conference in Nashville, where the publication will be unveiled by the editors and chapter authors at an interactive workshop.

 

This guide, which focuses on six key areas for developing an energy program, can help both small and large utilities hit the ground running in their efforts to reduce energy demand and increase renewable energy generation. The publication will be useful to utilities, environmental consultants, regulators, and researchers alike, helping us all work together to achieve needed success in the energy arena.

 

Chapter authors Karen Pallansch, Alexandria (Va.) Renew Enterprises; Chris Peot, DC Water (Washington, D.C.); Dave Reardon, HDR Engineering (Folsom, Calif.); Rusty Schroedel, Brown and Caldwell (Milwaukee); Bill Toffey, Effluential Synergies (Philadelphia); and Samantha Villegas, SaVi PR (South Riding, Va.) worked together to produce an easy-to-use guide filled with practical tips to help you quickly establish energy goals, an energy team, and champion; and identify next steps for reducing energy costs at your utility. Perhaps most importantly, the guide will help you develop an energy program that is customized to address your utility’s highest priority needs.

 

So, as you contemplate potential New Year’s resolutions for 2013, consider one that will benefit you and your organization, as well as your community and potentially 7 billion people worldwide. Help create or even champion your organization’s energy program, and help transform our wastewater treatment plants (more than 20,000 in North America alone) toward energy self-sufficiency!

 01/04/2013Permanent link

Happy New Year!  ()
 

Now is an amazing time to be a water environment professional, since there are a plethora of huge challenges facing us. The part we will play in developing and implementing solutions will be critical to 7 billion people around the

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Happy New Year!

 Permanent link

Happy New Year!

Posted by Ed McCormick, WEF Vice President
Posted Jan. 4, 2013
 

 

Now is an amazing time to be a water environment professional, since there are a plethora of huge challenges facing us. The part we will play in developing and implementing solutions will be critical to 7 billion people around the globe. It is the year 2013, yet more than 1 billion people worldwide still lack access to clean drinking water, and more than twice that number are without basic sanitation. But the good news is that our profession has all the tools we need to overcome these challenges. We have the knowledge and the resources to apply our expertise and develop creative strategies to solve the enormous global air and water quality issues. We are identifying solutions to address perhaps the greatest challenge our profession has ever faced — building resilient water infrastructure to meet society’s increased needs due to climate change, while simultaneously reducing our carbon footprint to one that can be sustained in the centuries ahead.

 

A great example of how our sector applies its skills and ingenuity is the current sea change in the wastewater sector. We are evolving thinking from treatment of water alone to recovering valuable resources, including clean, renewable energy; nutrients; and recycled water in our “green factories,” the facilities once known as wastewater treatment plants.

 

Everyone in the water sector is talking about the nexus between water and power. The power sector is a major consumer of water while the water sector is a major consumer of power. Because of this link, efforts to reduce water use provide energy savings, and efforts to reduce energy use save water. In addition, both sectors are impacted by, and have an impact on climate change. This year, we celebrate the 100th anniversary of activated sludge, a technology that revolutionized wastewater treatment. Today, we look toward new technologies and approaches that are just as effective as activated sludge, but much less energy-intensive. Some of the best minds in our industry, such as Professor Perry McCarty of Stanford University (Palo Alto, Calif.), are at work researching how to attain the “holy grail” of anaerobic secondary treatment, which would cut energy use significantly while increasing biogas production and associated clean, renewable energy production.

 

WEF is leading the water sector forward into this brave new world, taking bold action to provide the water community with practical tools to reduce our carbon footprint and reliance on fossil fuels while increasing energy production revenues, through a new water and wastewater utility guide to more sustainable energy management. This guide will be published this spring, with copies available at the May 6–9 Energy and Water Conference in Nashville, where the publication will be unveiled by the editors and chapter authors at an interactive workshop.

 

This guide, which focuses on six key areas for developing an energy program, can help both small and large utilities hit the ground running in their efforts to reduce energy demand and increase renewable energy generation. The publication will be useful to utilities, environmental consultants, regulators, and researchers alike, helping us all work together to achieve needed success in the energy arena.

 

Chapter authors Karen Pallansch, Alexandria (Va.) Renew Enterprises; Chris Peot, DC Water (Washington, D.C.); Dave Reardon, HDR Engineering (Folsom, Calif.); Rusty Schroedel, Brown and Caldwell (Milwaukee); Bill Toffey, Effluential Synergies (Philadelphia); and Samantha Villegas, SaVi PR (South Riding, Va.) worked together to produce an easy-to-use guide filled with practical tips to help you quickly establish energy goals, an energy team, and champion; and identify next steps for reducing energy costs at your utility. Perhaps most importantly, the guide will help you develop an energy program that is customized to address your utility’s highest priority needs.

 

So, as you contemplate potential New Year’s resolutions for 2013, consider one that will benefit you and your organization, as well as your community and potentially 7 billion people worldwide. Help create or even champion your organization’s energy program, and help transform our wastewater treatment plants (more than 20,000 in North America alone) toward energy self-sufficiency!

Posted by Woo Jun at 01/04/2013 03:09:23 PM | 


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McCormick 14-15 LOW RESPosted by:
Ed McCormick,
2014-2015 President
 

Ed McCormick is the 2014-2015 President of the Water Environment Federation (WEF), an international organization of water quality professionals headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia.

Ed was most recently Deputy General Manager (DGM) for the Union Sanitary District (USD) in Union City, California, a 30 mgd water resource recovery agency. Prior to USD, Ed was Manager of Wastewater Engineering for the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) in Oakland, California, an internationally recognized public water/wastewater utility serving 1.4 million customers, where he worked for nearly 30 years. Ed’s leadership helped EBMUD to become the first wastewater utility in North America to be a net producer of renewable energy in 2012.

Ed was responsible for EBMUD’s wastewater capital program, energy management, engineering, construction, information systems, and public outreach. Ed has overseen the engineering, construction and startup of more than $1.6 billion in wastewater and water capital infrastructure. He led the development of EBMUD’s Water Recycling Program from 0.2 mgd in 1994 to a 9 mgd enterprise.

Prior to EBMUD, Ed worked as an Environmental Engineering Project Manager for Brown and Caldwell Consultants in the planning and designing of wastewater treatment, power generation and water recycling facilities.

A WEF member since 1997, Ed has held multiple leadership roles at WEF. He served previously on the Board of Trustees (2008-2013), the House of Delegates, as Chair of the Utility Management Committee, and Vice Chair of the Long Range Planning Committee. He is also a member of the California Water Environment Association (CWEA) and the New England Environment Association (NEWEA).

Ed holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, a Master’s degree in Public Administration (MPA) from JFK University, and a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.