The 'Lucky Seven'

Posted by George S. Hawkins, General Manager, DC Water
Feb. 12, 2013
 

 

I was honored to speak on behalf of the public water sector in the Water Leaders session at the WEFTEC® 2012 conference. The following excerpts from my comments appear in the January issue of WE&T and cover the ‘lucky seven’ principles that I believe should guide the future of the water sector.

 

Pride. Back when I was an enforcement lawyer at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or running environmental nonprofits in New Jersey, or even running the District of Columbia Department of the Environment that regulates DC Water in part, I thought of our sector as polluters. I think regulators and the public still see us this way, too, and the media often follow right along. Yet there has been no instance in which I have been more wrong! Treatment plants don’t generate the pollution that is coming into our facilities—people do. Almost every action that requires water
generates used water thereafter. We take this water and cleanse it on everyone’s behalf. In fact, we clear out more trash, remove more pollutants, clean more water, and protect the lives of more people—and every other living organism—than anyone else. We should remember this reality and shout it from the mountaintops to anyone who will listen. A healthy civilization rests on our broad shoulders, and we should feel enormous pride in the service we deliver.

 

Read about the remaining 'lucky seven' principles. 

 

 02/12/2013Permanent link

The 'Lucky Seven'  ()
 

I was honored to speak on behalf of the public water sector in the Water Leaders session at the WEFTEC® 2012 conference. The following excerpts from my comments appear in the January issue of WE&T and cover the ‘lucky seven’ principles that I believe should guide the future of the water sector.  

 

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The 'Lucky Seven'

 Permanent link

The 'Lucky Seven'

Posted by George S. Hawkins, General Manager, DC Water
Feb. 12, 2013
 

 

I was honored to speak on behalf of the public water sector in the Water Leaders session at the WEFTEC® 2012 conference. The following excerpts from my comments appear in the January issue of WE&T and cover the ‘lucky seven’ principles that I believe should guide the future of the water sector.

 

Pride. Back when I was an enforcement lawyer at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or running environmental nonprofits in New Jersey, or even running the District of Columbia Department of the Environment that regulates DC Water in part, I thought of our sector as polluters. I think regulators and the public still see us this way, too, and the media often follow right along. Yet there has been no instance in which I have been more wrong! Treatment plants don’t generate the pollution that is coming into our facilities—people do. Almost every action that requires water
generates used water thereafter. We take this water and cleanse it on everyone’s behalf. In fact, we clear out more trash, remove more pollutants, clean more water, and protect the lives of more people—and every other living organism—than anyone else. We should remember this reality and shout it from the mountaintops to anyone who will listen. A healthy civilization rests on our broad shoulders, and we should feel enormous pride in the service we deliver.

 

Read about the remaining 'lucky seven' principles. 

 

Posted by Jon Byus at 02/12/2013 09:07:17 AM | 


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George S. HawkinsGeorge S. Hawkins, General Manager, DC Water 

George S. Hawkins is general manager of DC Water, which provides drinking water delivery and wastewater collection and treatment for a population of more than 600,000 in the District of Columbia, as well as the millions of people who work in or visit the District. DC Water operates the world’s largest advanced wastewater treatment plant and also treats wastewater for a population of 1.6 million in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties in Maryland, and Fairfax and Loudoun counties in Virginia.

Mr. Hawkins began his career practicing law for the Boston firm Ropes & Gray, and is a member of the Bar in Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from Princeton University in 1983 and Cum Laude from Harvard Law School in 1987.