Water Is for Everyone, Forever

By Monica LaBiche Brown

Posted Sept. 20, 2013 

 

As an international development nonprofit organization, Water For People works with local partners to develop innovative and long-lasting solutions to water, sanitation and hygiene problems so that everyone in the developing world has access to these services. We call this approach "Everyone, Forever." When we say Everyone, we mean every family, every school and every clinic in a defined geographic region — like a district or a municipality — has access to improved water supply. Even the hardest to reach, the poorest and most isolated must have these basic services for everyone to stay healthy and for economic development to occur.

 

The name also means everyone participates. We work closely with local governments to build capacity and activate funds that have been set aside for water and sanitation. We never fully fund the program and instead leverage our donor dollars with local funds from the government and community so that everyone pays. We believe that communities must understand the importance of paying because inevitably the system will break down and need repair, so monies are put aside for repair and maintenance or even replacement. Our goal is to make sure that the community or district is independent and never needs aid from another nongovernmental organization again.

 

The forever piece is what sets Water For People apart. Most organizations consider a project complete once the infrastructure is in place. For us, this is where the project begins. We work to ensure that communities and local institutions address all the challenges of water-system management — monitoring, operation and maintenance, and capital replacement. We train and incubate water and sanitation businesses so that the private sector is another arm to providing infrastructure support. And for each of our regions, we make a commitment to monitor our work well into the future, not counting any project as truly sustainable until it has lasted to the 10-year mark.

 

Given the sheer size of the global water and sanitation problem, Water For People understands that we cannot tackle this problem alone, but we can have a global impact through influence by helping to shape the standards and practices of the developing world — and you can be part of this!  Please join us for WFP’s Blues Bash at WEFTEC 2013 in Chicago on Oct. 7, or visit www.waterforpeople.org and show your support!

 

 

 09/20/2013Permanent link

Water Is for Everyone, Forever  ()
 

Given the sheer size of the global water and sanitation problem, Water For People understands that we cannot tackle this problem alone, but we can have a global impact through influence by helping to shape the standards and practices of the developing world — and you can be part of this!

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Water Is for Everyone, Forever

 Permanent link

Water Is for Everyone, Forever

By Monica LaBiche Brown

Posted Sept. 20, 2013 

 

As an international development nonprofit organization, Water For People works with local partners to develop innovative and long-lasting solutions to water, sanitation and hygiene problems so that everyone in the developing world has access to these services. We call this approach "Everyone, Forever." When we say Everyone, we mean every family, every school and every clinic in a defined geographic region — like a district or a municipality — has access to improved water supply. Even the hardest to reach, the poorest and most isolated must have these basic services for everyone to stay healthy and for economic development to occur.

 

The name also means everyone participates. We work closely with local governments to build capacity and activate funds that have been set aside for water and sanitation. We never fully fund the program and instead leverage our donor dollars with local funds from the government and community so that everyone pays. We believe that communities must understand the importance of paying because inevitably the system will break down and need repair, so monies are put aside for repair and maintenance or even replacement. Our goal is to make sure that the community or district is independent and never needs aid from another nongovernmental organization again.

 

The forever piece is what sets Water For People apart. Most organizations consider a project complete once the infrastructure is in place. For us, this is where the project begins. We work to ensure that communities and local institutions address all the challenges of water-system management — monitoring, operation and maintenance, and capital replacement. We train and incubate water and sanitation businesses so that the private sector is another arm to providing infrastructure support. And for each of our regions, we make a commitment to monitor our work well into the future, not counting any project as truly sustainable until it has lasted to the 10-year mark.

 

Given the sheer size of the global water and sanitation problem, Water For People understands that we cannot tackle this problem alone, but we can have a global impact through influence by helping to shape the standards and practices of the developing world — and you can be part of this!  Please join us for WFP’s Blues Bash at WEFTEC 2013 in Chicago on Oct. 7, or visit www.waterforpeople.org and show your support!

 

 

Posted by Jonathan Byus at 09/20/2013 11:01:08 AM | 


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Monica LaBiche BrownMonica LaBiche Brown joined Water For People in 2006 and currently serves as the deputy director of resource development. She has more than 10 years of experience generating revenue and increasing the base of support for national and international nonprofit organizations. Her experience includes four years at Mercy Housing, a national affordable housing nonprofit, and 12 years at the World Bank, an international financial institution whose mission is to fight poverty by providing loans to developing countries for capital programs.

A native of Mahé, Seychelles, Monica grew up in Uganda and moved to the United States when she was 17. This upbringing has had a strong influence on her passion for development work. She has a master’s degree in Organizational Management from Regis University and a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Spelman College.

 


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