Water Week 2014: Advocacy, Innovation, and Education

By Ed McCormick
Posted April 3, 2014
 

 

The Water Week 2014 “fly-in” to Washington DC is nearly upon us! From April 7-9, water professionals from across the United States are convening in our nation’s capital to help educate national leaders on the critical importance of sustainable clean water to our economy, environment, and the protection of public health for every American.

 

Water Week 2014 provides a giant step toward a unified voice for clean water. This landmark gathering is being accomplished through the collaboration of three leading national clean water organizations - the Water Environment Federation (WEF), the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), and the Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), in concert with regional partners, with a combined total of nearly 40,000 members. As a member of both the WEF and WERF Boards, and a long-time member of NACWA, I believe that collaboration among the leading water organizations toward a unified voice for Clean Water, including support for research, development, and implementation of our “Utilities of the Future” has never been stronger.

 

What makes Water Week 2014 truly special is the focus on innovative new state-of-the-art technologies that are changing the face of water management forever. The U.S. clean water community is experiencing a sea change as we transform our wastewater treatment facilities into “green factories” – now called “water resource recovery facilities” - that utilize the resources in wastewater to manufacture useful products for society, helping to eliminate waste. These products already include clean renewable energy, transportation fuels (biodiesel, CNG), drought-relieving recycled water, fertilizer, and valuable nutrient recovery (phosphorous, nitrogen).

 

Two years ago, the East Bay Municipal Utility District in Oakland, California (for whom I worked for 30 years) became the first wastewater agency in North America and the second in the world to be a net producer of energy. Since then, scores of public utilities across the continent are on the path to becoming net energy producers. This renaissance in water resource recovery is providing our communities with a more cost-effective model for cleaning water that minimizes wasting of valuable resources, and provides renewable energy and an additional source of water. These all add up to enhanced climate resiliency. We are truly becoming the water resource recovery “Utilities of the Future”, and a national mandate to support this sea change is critical to our communities – thus, the importance of Water Week 2014.

 

If you are unable to join us for Water Week 2014, I urge you to write your congressional representatives about the importance of clean water and become active in WEF’s government affairs program as a Water Advocate. Together we can educate our national leaders on the water needs of our communities as we usher in a new era of cost-effective, environmentally beneficial clean water through utilities of the future – our “Water Resource Recovery” facilities.

 04/03/2014Permanent link

Water Week 2014: Advocacy, Innovation, and Education  ()
 WEF President-Elect Ed McCormick talks about WEF/NACWA/WERF Fly-In and Utility of the Future in the latest WEF WaterBlog

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Water Week 2014: Advocacy, Innovation, and Education

 Permanent link

Water Week 2014: Advocacy, Innovation, and Education

By Ed McCormick
Posted April 3, 2014
 

 

The Water Week 2014 “fly-in” to Washington DC is nearly upon us! From April 7-9, water professionals from across the United States are convening in our nation’s capital to help educate national leaders on the critical importance of sustainable clean water to our economy, environment, and the protection of public health for every American.

 

Water Week 2014 provides a giant step toward a unified voice for clean water. This landmark gathering is being accomplished through the collaboration of three leading national clean water organizations - the Water Environment Federation (WEF), the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), and the Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF), in concert with regional partners, with a combined total of nearly 40,000 members. As a member of both the WEF and WERF Boards, and a long-time member of NACWA, I believe that collaboration among the leading water organizations toward a unified voice for Clean Water, including support for research, development, and implementation of our “Utilities of the Future” has never been stronger.

 

What makes Water Week 2014 truly special is the focus on innovative new state-of-the-art technologies that are changing the face of water management forever. The U.S. clean water community is experiencing a sea change as we transform our wastewater treatment facilities into “green factories” – now called “water resource recovery facilities” - that utilize the resources in wastewater to manufacture useful products for society, helping to eliminate waste. These products already include clean renewable energy, transportation fuels (biodiesel, CNG), drought-relieving recycled water, fertilizer, and valuable nutrient recovery (phosphorous, nitrogen).

 

Two years ago, the East Bay Municipal Utility District in Oakland, California (for whom I worked for 30 years) became the first wastewater agency in North America and the second in the world to be a net producer of energy. Since then, scores of public utilities across the continent are on the path to becoming net energy producers. This renaissance in water resource recovery is providing our communities with a more cost-effective model for cleaning water that minimizes wasting of valuable resources, and provides renewable energy and an additional source of water. These all add up to enhanced climate resiliency. We are truly becoming the water resource recovery “Utilities of the Future”, and a national mandate to support this sea change is critical to our communities – thus, the importance of Water Week 2014.

 

If you are unable to join us for Water Week 2014, I urge you to write your congressional representatives about the importance of clean water and become active in WEF’s government affairs program as a Water Advocate. Together we can educate our national leaders on the water needs of our communities as we usher in a new era of cost-effective, environmentally beneficial clean water through utilities of the future – our “Water Resource Recovery” facilities.

Posted by Jonathan Byus at 04/03/2014 10:06:52 AM | 


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McCormick 14-15 LOW RESPosted by:
Ed McCormick,
2014-2015 President
 

Ed McCormick is the 2014-2015 President of the Water Environment Federation (WEF), an international organization of water quality professionals headquartered in Alexandria, Virginia.

Ed was most recently Deputy General Manager (DGM) for the Union Sanitary District (USD) in Union City, California, a 30 mgd water resource recovery agency. Prior to USD, Ed was Manager of Wastewater Engineering for the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) in Oakland, California, an internationally recognized public water/wastewater utility serving 1.4 million customers, where he worked for nearly 30 years. Ed’s leadership helped EBMUD to become the first wastewater utility in North America to be a net producer of renewable energy in 2012.

Ed was responsible for EBMUD’s wastewater capital program, energy management, engineering, construction, information systems, and public outreach. Ed has overseen the engineering, construction and startup of more than $1.6 billion in wastewater and water capital infrastructure. He led the development of EBMUD’s Water Recycling Program from 0.2 mgd in 1994 to a 9 mgd enterprise.

Prior to EBMUD, Ed worked as an Environmental Engineering Project Manager for Brown and Caldwell Consultants in the planning and designing of wastewater treatment, power generation and water recycling facilities.

A WEF member since 1997, Ed has held multiple leadership roles at WEF. He served previously on the Board of Trustees (2008-2013), the House of Delegates, as Chair of the Utility Management Committee, and Vice Chair of the Long Range Planning Committee. He is also a member of the California Water Environment Association (CWEA) and the New England Environment Association (NEWEA).

Ed holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, a Master’s degree in Public Administration (MPA) from JFK University, and a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.