Continuing drought spurs new plans, actions in Texas

 

Much of Texas still is grappling with dwindling and uncertain water supplies. This decline is caused by a prolonged drought that is now entering its seventh year and includes the record-setting year of 2011, when the state experienced its most severe single-year drought in history.

 

With conditions abnormally dry throughout the populous metro regions of the state and water storage volumes close to critical levels in reservoirs providing water to Central Texas, agencies are hurrying to develop new sources and secure reliable future supplies.

 

As options are explored, Texas utilities are starting to focus more on reclaimed wastewater, which increasingly is being viewed as a valuable supply alternative. But with limited allocations coveted, disputes normally reserved for water are beginning to pull wastewater into the fray.

 

As you’ll see in the related story by Jeff Gunderson in the May WE&T, new supply projects for central Texas are in the works, but the struggle for competing water uses continues and the significance of reclaimed wastewater in a water-stressed environment continues to unfold. Find out more about what’s happening in Texas at http://bit.ly/SiKHCR.

 05/29/2014Permanent link

Continuing drought spurs new plans, actions in Texas  ()
 Wastewater is beginning to play a more prominent role as a solution to Texas’ water crisis.

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Continuing drought spurs new plans, actions in Texas

 Permanent link

Continuing drought spurs new plans, actions in Texas

 

Much of Texas still is grappling with dwindling and uncertain water supplies. This decline is caused by a prolonged drought that is now entering its seventh year and includes the record-setting year of 2011, when the state experienced its most severe single-year drought in history.

 

With conditions abnormally dry throughout the populous metro regions of the state and water storage volumes close to critical levels in reservoirs providing water to Central Texas, agencies are hurrying to develop new sources and secure reliable future supplies.

 

As options are explored, Texas utilities are starting to focus more on reclaimed wastewater, which increasingly is being viewed as a valuable supply alternative. But with limited allocations coveted, disputes normally reserved for water are beginning to pull wastewater into the fray.

 

As you’ll see in the related story by Jeff Gunderson in the May WE&T, new supply projects for central Texas are in the works, but the struggle for competing water uses continues and the significance of reclaimed wastewater in a water-stressed environment continues to unfold. Find out more about what’s happening in Texas at http://bit.ly/SiKHCR.

Posted by Jonathan Byus at 05/29/2014 05:12:26 PM | 


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Mr. Coonan is the President of the Water Environment Association of Texas and has more than 30 years of experience conducting water resources planning studies and designs. He is a Principal with Alan Plummer Associates, Inc., in their Austin, Texas office. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Missouri – Rolla (now Missouri University of Science and Technology). Mr. Coonan has completed numerous reclaimed water projects for utilities across Texas, allowing them to conserve their precious water resources.