Gaining innovation momentum

By Barry Liner
Aug. 19, 2014
 

 

The water sector is changing fast, and major players have developed ambitious goals, including those found in The Water Resources Utility of the Future from WEF, the Water Environment Research Foundation, and the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, the Water Technology Innovation Blueprint from U.S. Environment Protection Agency, and The Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities from the U.S. Department of Energy.  All water sector professionals share the responsibility to turn these aspirational concepts into practice, and we are doing just that at the Federation.  

 

Catalyzing innovation is one of WEF's three critical objectives, and the amazing achievements and ideas presented at WEFTEC play an essential role in fulfilling that objective. Beyond WEFTEC, innovation is integrated into WEF activities year round. An innovation annual now in development will provide brief technical stories that highlight the achievements by WEF and its members and its partners to advance the water sector. Topics range from green infrastructure to nutrient recovery to energy generation to asset management to excellence in operations.

 

The innovation annual will be available at the WEFTEC Innovation Pavilion — presented with partners BlueTech® Research and Imagine H2O since 2012 — where you’ll learn about the activities of such water innovation clusters and accelerators as Business, Research, Entrepreneurship in Wisconsin (BREW) by The Water Council; the New Orleans Water Challenge; and innovations in water reuse, resiliency, and sustainability. 

 

Please visit the Innovation Showcase Pavilion at WEFTEC 2014 and join us in committing to catalyzing innovation in the water sector. The hope is that championing innovation becomes one of your professional critical objectives as well.

 

 

 

 08/19/2014Permanent link

Gaining Innovation Momentum  ()
 Catalyzing innovation is one of WEF’s three Critical Objectives, and the amazing achievements and ideas presented at WEFTEC play an essential role in fulfilling that objective. Beyond WEFTEC, innovation is integrated into WEF activities year round.

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Gaining Innovation Momentum

 Permanent link

Gaining innovation momentum

By Barry Liner
Aug. 19, 2014
 

 

The water sector is changing fast, and major players have developed ambitious goals, including those found in The Water Resources Utility of the Future from WEF, the Water Environment Research Foundation, and the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, the Water Technology Innovation Blueprint from U.S. Environment Protection Agency, and The Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities from the U.S. Department of Energy.  All water sector professionals share the responsibility to turn these aspirational concepts into practice, and we are doing just that at the Federation.  

 

Catalyzing innovation is one of WEF's three critical objectives, and the amazing achievements and ideas presented at WEFTEC play an essential role in fulfilling that objective. Beyond WEFTEC, innovation is integrated into WEF activities year round. An innovation annual now in development will provide brief technical stories that highlight the achievements by WEF and its members and its partners to advance the water sector. Topics range from green infrastructure to nutrient recovery to energy generation to asset management to excellence in operations.

 

The innovation annual will be available at the WEFTEC Innovation Pavilion — presented with partners BlueTech® Research and Imagine H2O since 2012 — where you’ll learn about the activities of such water innovation clusters and accelerators as Business, Research, Entrepreneurship in Wisconsin (BREW) by The Water Council; the New Orleans Water Challenge; and innovations in water reuse, resiliency, and sustainability. 

 

Please visit the Innovation Showcase Pavilion at WEFTEC 2014 and join us in committing to catalyzing innovation in the water sector. The hope is that championing innovation becomes one of your professional critical objectives as well.

 

 

 

Posted by Jonathan Byus at 08/19/2014 03:18:30 PM | 


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Liner189Posted by:
Dr. Barry Liner, Director of the Water Science & Engineering Center at WEF 

Barry Liner is the director of WEF’s Water Science and Engineering Center. Since joining WEF in 2010, he has been responsible for leading innovation and water/energy strategies, including the WEF Energy Roadmap and the Innovation Pavilion at WEFTEC, the world’s largest water-quality conference. 

Before WEF, Liner served as assistant professor and director of international engineering programs at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., where he founded Engineers for International Development and also helped develop and deliver a groundbreaking Public Sector Entrepreneurship graduate program for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Previously, he led change management efforts at AEM Corp., including serving as the Lead Appraiser for the world’s first CMMI for Services appraisal to be quality approved by the Software Engineering Institute. He also managed regulatory support projects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water and IT Projects for both public- and private-sector clients.

Liner also worked at Black & Veatch, where he delivered management consulting services focusing on operational efficiency, public private partnerships, benchmarking and strategic finance to over 30 water and wastewater utilities and research organizations throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and Peru. He also served at the World Bank, developing a protocol to monitor and evaluate progress toward the water and sanitation targets of the Millennium Development Goals. Liner began his professional career as a product manager for HF scientific, where he led the Lovibond product line after the firm’s acquisition.

Liner earned his doctorate in sustainable water resources modeling from George Mason University. He received a graduate certificate in business administration from Georgetown University, a master's degree in urban systems engineering from George Mason University, and graduated with bachelor's in economics from Virginia Tech.  He is a licensed PE and also holds sustainability credentials in Envision and LEED.