WE&T Magazine

WET_cover1_July11_90Water Environment & Technology (WE&T) is the premier magazine for the water quality field. WE&T provides information on what professionals demand: cutting-edge technologies, innovative solutions, operations and maintenance, regulatory and legislative impacts, and professional development.

 


July 2011, Vol. 23, No.7

Featured Articles

What you know can save you

Moore art

Many utility managers have found ways to cut their electricity costs with little or no capital investment. Large consumers of electricity often are afforded a variety of options for purchasing electricity from their local electric utilities. Options for pricing and the corresponding opportunities for cost reduction generally increase with increased energy consumption. Managers who understand how electricity is priced and purchased and who know their alternatives can identify and take advantage of opportunities to reduce energy costs.  

 

Side steps

pottinger art

Inflow and infiltration (I/I) reduction efforts typically involve repairing or replacing aging and leaking sewer lines, but one area often overlooked or deemed too difficult to address are side sewers — the portion of the lateral that sits on private property. But as one pacific Northwest utility found, replacing side sewers can significantly reduce the I/I in the wastewater system, as well as provide a benefit to the property owner. 

 

News

Wisconsin tackles tandem certification and training programs

News

Something rather unusual is happening in Wisconsin: The direction and timing of two projects at different government agencies have aligned, enabling the agencies to integrate the projects.

The Wisconsin Bureau of Apprenticeship Standards (BAS) is developing a new wastewater operator apprenticeship program at the same time that the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is revamping its operator certification code. To capitalize on this timing, the two agencies have found several ways to collaborate to encourage good training practices, career advancement, and a supply of well-trained operators to succeed those who are ready to retire. 

Read more

Coming in the next issue:
WET_cover1_Aug11_90

August 2011

New perspectives on reuse

For many parts of the United States, water reuse is evolving from a luxury to a necessity. This shift brings with it new opportunities and technologies as well as new challenges.

In some cases, the combination of reuse and decentralized treatment can result in sustainable, urban and suburban water infrastructure systems. These forward-thinking systems enable users to treat and reuse water close to its source, saving energy and money as well as reducing greenhouse gases.

In other cases, large systems make sense. For example, the world’s largest indirect potable reuse project began operation in Southern California in 2008. It pumps high-quality water into the Orange County Groundwater Basin to augment the water supply and protect the basin from seawater intrusion. A new expansion project gives Orange County the opportunity to apply lessons learned from the first 2.5 years of system operation.

Westward bound

In just a few months — from Oct. 15 to Oct. 19 to be exact — Los Angeles will serve as the backdrop for WEFTEC® 2011. The August issue includes sneak previews on some of the events and opportunities WEFTEC will offer.

Meet the two Opening General Session speakers and learn about the very different paths that led them to the same passion: providing clean and safe drinking water to developing countries. One used decades of academic research and an unassuming, everyday type of cloth to make water supplies safer. The other has parlayed a relaxed approach, good music, and wine into new drinking water wells worldwide.

There also will be an increased emphasis on stormwater at WEFTEC 2011, with programming designed for water professionals who are exploring the technical and administrative complexities of stormwater management. Find out what WEFTEC has to offer regarding this growing trend in the wastewater industry.

 

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