WE&T Magazine

WET_cover1_Jan12_90Water Environment & Technology (WE&T) is the premier magazine for the water quality field. WE&T provides information on what professionals demand: cutting-edge technologies, innovative solutions, operations and maintenance, regulatory and legislative impacts, and professional development.

 


January 2012, Vol. 24, No.1

Featured Articles

Despite challenges, Japan speeds toward recovery

japan art Between May 1 and 3, 2010, numerous streams and the Cumberland River inundated Nashville, Tenn., and its surrounding areas with the worst flooding in more than half a century. The Metro Water Services Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) Biosolids Facility was left under more than 1 m (3 ft) of water, without power, and severely damaged. Metro staff members worked tirelessly to salvage equipment, remove water, and prevent further damage. Once the waters receded, Metro Water was left without a functional biosolids processing facility.

 

Flood recovery by the book (while writing it)

flood recovery art Between May 1 and 3, 2010, numerous streams and the Cumberland River inundated Nashville, Tenn., and its surrounding areas with the worst flooding in more than half a century. The Metro Water Services Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) Biosolids Facility was left under more than 1 m (3 ft) of water, without power, and severely damaged. Metro staff members worked tirelessly to salvage equipment, remove water, and prevent further damage. Once the waters receded, Metro Water was left without a functional biosolids processing facility.

 

News

State of the Industry

WE&T’s annual State of the Industry section examines where energy management, nutrient removal, financing, and overflow prevention are today and what’s likely in store for the next year. Read more

Coming in the next issue:
WET_cover1_Feb12_90

February 2012

From drop to discharge

No one-size-fits-all solution for handling excess flows exists. But failure to manage that water properly can lead to overloaded collection systems and combined and sanitary sewer overflows.

Different places — Missouri and California, in this case — with varying conditions, such as climate, infrastructure, and regulations, require different wet weather approaches. Controlling and treating all flows requires applying the right water resource tools for the region.

But once this water hits the collection system, storage and treatment are required before it can be discharged. In accomplishing this goal, Bremerton, Wash., has gained 10 years of experience operating a limited-use high-rate clarification process. Along the way the facility’s operators have learned a great deal about how to best operate and maintain this type of facility.

In 2008 Onondaga County, N.Y., followed suit by bringing on-line a series of regional treatment facilities to handle excess stormwater. But a few years ago, the county also added in a comprehensive green infrastructure program to capture the city’s stormwater and reduce the effects of runoff to the sewer system.

 

Disinfection developments

Proper disinfection of wastewater protects public health and the environment. But as detection limits for microconstituents drop and uses for effluent increase, disinfection practices and processes must evolve and expand to address new concerns.

Learn about a study on current and emerging tertiary and advanced treatment technologies for reclaimed water disinfection and microconstituent destruction. The study’s primary goal was to identify a low-cost technology (or technologies) that would simultaneously destroy both pathogens and microconstituents.

Also in this issue, read about the method that goes into selecting a disinfection process for reuse applications as well as some emerging disinfectants and combinations of processes.

 

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